Set Sail on the S.S. Marquise

If you're lost in a metaphorical ocean of hesitation and indecisiveness on the style of your engagement ring, climb aboard the S.S. Marquise with us as we're totally shipping this cut and the situation is serious.

It is one of the only center stone designs that manifests the ability to smile back at you.

Otherwise known as the Navette cut, for its shape of a little ship (French derivative), the Marquise is made up of at least 58 facets and can be described as an elongated rounded shape with pointed ends.

Thanks to its dramatic narrow & symmetrical design, the cut accentuates your bare skin for a shot-ready pic for all social media purposes.

Whether you choose a solitaire, a halo setting, or spice it up with an east-to-west orientation to cradle the marquise, you can count on the style to make it on everybody's ring envy wishlist.

In an era when people couldn't post a picture of who they liked as your standard PDA, King Louis XV of France made do. It was the 18th Century - when you went grand gesture, you went grand gesture.

And by that, we mean he requested a jeweler to design a whole new cut/shape for his sweetheart with the condition that it resembled the smile of Jean Antoinette Poisson, who, by the way, was his mistress not his queen.

I guess you could say she "poisson"-ed their relationship... You see what I - Alright, cool. Moving on.

Just taking from the positive here: the shape was then developed and modified overtime to become the brilliant cut we recognize it as today. It reached popularity between the 1960s and 1980s; people described the Marquise as a vintage styled design because of its long lived tale. 

If you ever need a fun fact moment when showing off your ring, that's one to tell.

There's a reason why the Marquise is considered one of the 'brilliant' cuts; the surfaces on the cut allows much light to be reflected off, creating maximum fire & brilliance for a cut of its proportion and silhouette.

The design also hides minor imperfections because the cut has a lower clarity grade than others and can be customized in a variety of colors, faceting techniques (including the rose cut we did down below with a lab-grown champagne sapphire), in diamond and diamond alternatives alike, including moissanite.

The Marquise cut is perfect if you're shopping for the minimalist in you or your S.O., but the safety of the stone is equally essential to take into consideration.

Since it has sharp edges, the gemstone is vulnerable to chipping so our professional suggestion is to have "V-end" or "V-tip" prongs to keep the corners safe so you can wear that show-stopping bling thing of a ring. Or go for a bezel setting!

Also, if you're going to do any physical activities, it's best to set it aside or be more mindful of how you interact with your surroundings with it on.

Singer/Songwriter Ashlee Simpson's engagement ring is a prime example of how the marquise has a je ne sais qua air about it.

Evan Ross proposed to her back in 2014 with a 5-carat feature-cut marquise diamond ring with 12 calibrated rubies and 130 accent diamonds, Edwardian-styled. It is incomparable to a lot of rings out there, in our opinion - we truly L.O.V.E. the thing. (Image Source: Chelsea Lauren/WireImage, Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images for Jessica Simpson Collection)

However, if you're looking for a beautiful setting to grace the fingers of the "super" lady in your life that puts fires out everywhere on a day-to-day basis, Actress Katie Cassidy's (The Black Canary from DC Comics' TV series Arrow) engagement ring is one to knock you out.

Matthew Rodgers envisioned only the best for his fiancee: a 5-carat marquise diamond setting, enveloped by a ton of gorgeous diamond melee accent stones. It's a stunningly modern, more minimal design for a marquise and we love the effort Rodgers put in to custom creating a ring just for Cassidy. (Image Source Unknown.)

Customization just so happens to be our specialty, if you were ever curious!

So set sail; safe travels. Sea you later and what not. Until next time!


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